Will Passengers Actually Boycott United Airlines?

March 16, 2018
Updated 2mo ago

It’s been a rough month for United Airlines, but even this week’s latest scandals might not be enough to bite into the company’s bottom line.

After all, when it comes down to it, The Points Guy’s Emily McNutt said only one thing really matters to consumers.

“Industry trends show us that passengers are looking for low fares,” the news editor told Cheddar. “So I don’t think the incidents would be that detrimental for United in the long run.”

Just this week a puppy died on a United flight, sparking national outrage and prompting Senator John Kennedy (R-LA) to propose legislation to protect pets while traveling. Days later another dog was mistakenly sent to Japan rather than Kansas City.

And it doesn’t stop there. Last year a passenger was dragged off a United cabin and a pet rabbit died on one of its aircrafts. Earlier this month, before the latest news, the company said it would subject its customer service staff to a mandatory “compassion” training to prevent such incidents from happening again.

But even if nothing changes, consumers who want to boycott but are driven by price may have little choice.

“Route networks are expanding in a way, but they’re also condensing in the sense that low-cost carriers are growing into this legacy market and taking over,” she said, “especially on domestic flights.”